Adopt A LAPCAT

Promoting adoption, spay/neuter, and forever homes

Be the Change For Animals

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You must be the change you wish to see in the world.  ~  Mahatma Gandhi

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Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.    
               ~  Margaret Mead

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Facts about U.S. Animal Shelters:

There are about 5,000 community animal shelters nationwide that are independent; there is no national organization monitoring these shelters. The terms “humane society” and “SPCA” are generic; shelters using those names are not part of the ASPCA or the Humane Society of the United States. Currently, no government institution or animal organization is responsible for tabulating national statistics for the animal protection movement.

· Approximately 5 million to 7 million companion animals enter animal shelters nationwide every year, and approximately 3 million to 4 million are euthanized (60 percent of dogs and 70 percent of cats). Shelter intakes are about evenly divided between those animals relinquished by owners and those picked up by animal control. These are national estimates; the percentage of euthanasia may vary from state to state.

· According to the National Council on Pet Population Study and Policy (NCPPSP), less than 2 percent of cats and only 15 to 20 percent of dogs are returned to their owners. Most of these were identified with tags, tattoos or microchips.

· Twenty-five percent of dogs who enter local shelters are purebred. (Source: NCPPSP)

· Only 10 percent of the animals received by shelters have been spayed or neutered, while 78 percent of pet dogs and 88 percent of pet cats are spayed or neutered, according to the American Pet Products Association (Source: APPA).

· More than 20 percent of people who leave dogs in shelters adopted them from a shelter. (Source: NCPPSP)

Facts about Pet Ownership in the U.S.: 

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· About 62 percent of all households in the United States have a pet. (Source: APPA)

· About 78.2 million dogs and about 86.4 million cats are owned in the United States. (Source: APPA)

· According to the National Council on Pet Population Study and Policy (NCPPSP), about 65 percent of pet owners acquire their pets free or at low cost.

· The majority of pets are obtained from acquaintances and family members. Twenty-six percent of dogs are purchased from breeders, 20 to 30 percent of cats and dogs are adopted from shelters and rescues, and 2 to 10 percent are purchased from pet shops.

· At least one-third of cats are acquired as strays. (Source: APPA)

· More than 20 percent of people who leave dogs in shelters adopted them from a shelter. (Source: NCPPSP)

· The cost of spaying and neutering a pet is less than the cost of raising puppies or kittens for one year.

· The average cost of basic food, supplies, medical care and training for a dog or cat is $600 to $900 annually. Seventy-eight percent of pet dogs and 88 percent of pet cats are spayed or neutered. (Source: APPA)

Facts about Pet Overpopulation in the U.S.:

· It is impossible to determine how many stray dogs and cats live in the United States; estimates for cats alone range up to 70 million.

· The average number of litters a fertile cat produces is one to two a year; the average number of kittens is four to six per litter.

· The average number of litters a fertile dog produces is one a year; the average number of puppies is four to six.

· Owned cats and dogs generally live longer, healthier lives than strays.

· Many strays are lost pets who were not kept properly indoors or provided with identification.

· Only 10 percent of the animals received by shelters have been spayed or neutered, while 78 percent of pet dogs and 88 percent of pet cats are spayed or neutered.

· The cost of spaying or neutering a pet is less than the cost of raising puppies or kittens for a year.

The following data are ASPCA estimates unless otherwise indicated.Blog the Change

You may also wish to visit:

The National Council on Pet Population Study & Policy (NCPPSP)
http://www.petpopulation.org

The American Veterinary Medical Association
http://www.avma.org (see U.S. Pet Ownership and Demographics)

(Via ASPCA; Adopt A Poody cartoon by Robert Seymour)

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October 15, 2012 - Posted by | Adoptions/Adoptathon, Animal Welfare/Protection, Education, Pet overpopulation, Spay/neuter | , , , , , ,

3 Comments

  1. Thanks for sharing this info – it’s definitely important to know what the situation is so that we can figure out how to address systemic problems and improve things!

    A.J.
    Be the Change for Animals
    I Still Want More Puppies

    Comment by wantmorepuppies | October 16, 2012

  2. I think awareness of the problems is the first step. Too many animal lovers either don’t know the facts or are in denial. The second step is to get involved, to get off our fannies and “do” rather than just talk. We have such a long way to go before the odds are stacked in favor of the animals. The many types of volunteering, fostering, spay/neuter, TNR, etc. are all positive steps in that long journey, but we each have to take that first step if we want to be part of the solution, or if we want the problems solved.

    The “more than 20 percent of people who adopted from a shelter leave dogs in shelters again” surprised me too. Perhaps they told themselves that “someone else will adopt this animal”? Denial can play such a big part in peoples’ lives, especially when people are looking for excuses.

    I know many people won’t even visit a shelter because “they’ll want to take them all home” or it just tears them apart to see those beautiful faces. Hopefully if shelters can progress (and it takes manpower and funds to do that), more people will be willing to consider making a shelter animal a new family member.

    I’m lucky as I’ve seen our local county shelter progress from a cement-block-and-chain-link holding facility where volunteers were barely tolerated to a state-of-the-art organization with a very strong volunteer force, and more important, a management staff who are willing to step out of the box and support some progressive, innovative programs. We still have a long way to go, but at least we’re headed in the right direction.

    Comment by LAPCATS Sacramento Area Cat & Kitten Adoptions | October 15, 2012

  3. Interesting lists of facts. A question I’d post to both you and your readers is “What can you do to stack the odds in favor of animals? Which one fact do you think you can impact and how?”

    Facts are merely information. On their own, they mean nothing. We must make meaning from them and then act upon it.

    Ask yourself WHY more than 20 percent of people who adopted from a shelter leave dogs in shelters again. What could the reasons be? What would make them value their responsibility for the life of that animal?

    Look beyond the information for inspiration.

    Thanks so much for Blogging the Change!

    Kim Clune
    Director: http://BetheChangeforAnimals.com
    Blogger: http://thisonewildlife.com

    Comment by BtC4animals | October 15, 2012


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